September 10, 2015

Your stomach bacteria determines which diet is best for weight reduction

The computational algorithm allowed for calculation of micronutrient content in different foods,
and hereby it is possible to calculate how diet impacts the metabolism in the human gut microbiome.
In the study it was found that subjects with low gene counts (LGC), having a compressed gut
microbiota, respond better to dietary intervention than subjects with a high gene count (HGC),
due to differences in the metabolism of the gut microbiota in the two groups.

(September 10. 2015)  New research enables "tailored" diet advice – based on our personal gut microbiome – for persons who want to lose weight and reduce the risk of disease. Systems biologists at Chalmers University of Technology have for the first time successfully identified in detail how some of our most common intestinal bacteria interact during metabolism.

The researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed a mathematical calculation platform that makes it possible to predict how different patients will respond to a modified diet, depending on how their gut microbiome is composed.

Work has been conducted in cooperation in the context of the EU funded project Metacardis, coordinated by professor Karine Clement at Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (Ican, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Inserm/Sorbonne University) in Paris and also includes professor Fredrik Bäckhed at the University of Gothenburg.

"This method allows us to begin identifying each individual bacteria type's metabolism and thus get a handle on the basic mechanisms in human metabolism," says Jens Nielsen, professor of systems biology at Chalmers and head of the research team.

There can be up to 1,000 different types of bacteria and other microorganisms in the human digestive system, many of which take part in metabolism in one way or another. The composition of the human gut microbiome greatly varies between individuals, for reasons that are largely unknown. However, research over the past few years has shown that there is a connection between some diseases and the composition of the gut microbiome.

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