January 15, 2016

Fuel cell breakthrough

Yushan Yan, at the wheel of a fuel cell vehicle, is conducting research on the use
of nickel as a catalyst in an alkaline electrolyte that promises to bring down the
cost of hydrogen fuel cells.

(January 15, 2016)  Yan research team reports success with low-cost nickel-based catalyst

Planes, Trains and Automobiles is a popular comedy from the 1980s, but there’s nothing funny about the amount of energy consumed by our nation’s transportation sector.

This sector — which includes passenger cars, trucks, buses, and rail, marine, and air transport — accounts for more than 20 percent of America’s energy use, mostly in the form of fossil fuels, so the search is on for environmentally friendly alternatives.

The two most promising current candidates for cars are fuel cells, which convert the chemical energy of hydrogen to electricity, and rechargeable batteries.

The University of Delaware’s Yushan Yan believes that fuel cells will eventually win out.

“Both fuel cells and batteries are clean technologies that have their own sets of challenges for commercialization,” says Yan, Distinguished Engineering Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

“The key difference, however, is that the problems facing battery cars, such as short driving range and long battery charging time, are left with the customers. By contrast, fuel cell cars demand almost no change in customer experience because they can be charged in less than 5 minutes and be driven for more than 300 miles in one charge. And these challenges, such as hydrogen production and transportation, lie with the engineers.”

journal reference (Open Access) >>