September 23, 2015

Antimicrobial Film for Future Implants

© Inserm, E. Falette

(September 23, 2015)  The implantation of medical devices is not without risks. Bacterial or fungal infections can occur and the body’s strong immune response may lead to the rejection of the implant. Researchers at Unit 1121 “Biomaterials and Bio-engineering” (Inserm/Strasbourg university) have succeeded in creating a biofilm with antimicrobial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties. It may be used to cover titanium implants (orthopaedic prostheses, pacemakers…) prevent or control post-operative infections. Other frequently used medical devices that cause numerous infectious problems, such as catheters, may also benefit.

These results are published in the journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.

See video on the discovery presented by Philippe Lavalle, Research Director at Inserm (subtitles soon available)

Implantable medical devices (prosthesis/pacemakers) are an ideal interface for micro-organisms, which can easily colonize their surface. As such, bacterial infection may occur and lead to an inflammatory reaction. This may cause the implant to be rejected. These infections are mainly caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, originating in the body, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These infections may also be fungal or caused by yeasts. The challenge presented by implanting medical devices in the body is preventing the occurrence of these infections, which lead to an immune response that compromises the success of the implant. Antibiotics are currently used during surgery or to coat certain implants. However, the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria now restricts their effectiveness.

A biofilm invisible to the naked eye…

It is within this context that researchers at the “Bioengineering and Biomaterials” Unit 1121 (Inserm/Strasbourg University) with four laboratories[1] have developed a biofilm with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Researchers have used a combination of two substances: polyarginine (PAR) and hyaluronic acid (HA), to develop and create a film invisible to the naked eye (between 400 and 600 nm thick) that is made of several layers. As arginine is metabolised by immune cells to fight pathogens, it has been used to communicate with the immune system to obtain the desired anti-inflammatory effect. Hyaluronic acid, a natural component of the body, was also chosen for its biocompatibility and inhibiting effect on bacterial growth.

journal reference >>